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A goose down duvet makes every night a restful night | Jansons Direct Linens

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For great quality goose down duvets, Jansons Direct Linens have a great selection of high quality bedding products that allow you to sleep in total comfort. Have a look around our website to find out more about what we can offer. If we re supposed to get 8 hours of sleep every night, it makes sense to try and make those 8 hours as comfortable as you possibly can. With affordable Egyptian cotton bed linen delivered to your door, Jansons Direct Linens are here to help you make every night a restful one.

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With such a luxurious range of quality bed linen, Jansons Direct Linens are truly the home of bedding materials that can aid with your comfort and relaxation. We offer free delivery on orders over 150, with next day delivery options and international shipping for our duvets and bedspreads. If you have any questions about for example our

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Gay Talese on the state of journalism, Iraq and his life

Saturday, October 27, 2007 

Gay Talese wants to go to Iraq. “It so happens there is someone that’s working on such a thing right now for me,” the 75-year-old legendary journalist and author told David Shankbone. “Even if I was on Al-Jazeera with a gun to my head, I wouldn’t be pleading with those bastards! I’d say, ‘Go ahead. Make my day.'”

Few reporters will ever reach the stature of Talese. His 1966 profile of Frank Sinatra, Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, was not only cited by The Economist as the greatest profile of Sinatra ever written, but is considered the greatest of any celebrity profile ever written. In the 70th anniversary issue of Esquire in October 2003, the editors declared the piece the “Best Story Esquire Ever Published.”

Talese helped create and define a new style of literary reporting called New Journalism. Talese himself told National Public Radio he rejects this label (“The term new journalism became very fashionable on college campuses in the 1970s and some of its practitioners tended to be a little loose with the facts. And that’s where I wanted to part company.”)

He is not bothered by the Bancrofts selling The Wall Street Journal—”It’s not like we should lament the passing of some noble dynasty!”—to Rupert Murdoch, but he is bothered by how the press supported and sold the Iraq War to the American people. “The press in Washington got us into this war as much as the people that are controlling it,” said Talese. “They took information that was second-hand information, and they went along with it.” He wants to see the Washington press corp disbanded and sent around the country to get back in touch with the people it covers; that the press should not be so focused on–and in bed with–the federal government.

Augusten Burroughs once said that writers are experience junkies, and Talese fits the bill. Talese–who has been married to Nan Talese (she edited James Frey’s Million Little Piece) for fifty years–can be found at baseball games in Cuba or the gay bars of Beijing, wanting to see humanity in all its experience.

Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s interview with Gay Talese.

David Shankbone: Does it bother you that your name has come to mean ‘homosexual’?

DS: [Laughs] “Sports Gay-zing”?

DS: Is your ancestry Sicilian or Northern?

DS: Southern, not Sicilian?

DS: Do you ever pay any attention to Italian politics and the happenings with the Lega Nord?

DS: They can’t seem to do anything politically. They can’t save Venice ….

DS: Do you believe in a higher power?

DS: What do you think happens when we die?

DS: Do you have religion?

DS: Do you pray?

DS: In certain moments more than others?

DS: When do you feel out of control?

DS: What did the letter say?

DS: How many times have you seen your own death?

DS: You wouldn’t want to be a Terri Schiavo.

DS: You’re quite sprite.

DS: Doing what you love

DS: What do you think is the reason there is this collective idea to give Americans a certain view of a place or a people that is not necessarily accurate? I think Iran is another good example, where we are consistently fed images and notions about a people and a culture that aren’t really accurate.

DS: Or fair minded. But the reality is far more interesting than the same stories we are consistently fed.

DS: And Americans are the donkeys as well?

DS: But people are still consuming what they’re throwing out there though.

DS: It’s dangerous to actually go out there and hit the pavement.

DS: How could there not be?

DS: Sure.

DS: Have you been there?

DS: Why haven’t you?

DS: That shouldn’t be too hard for you.

DS: Esquire?

DS: Esquire does political reporting.

DS: What would be the difficulties for you in achieving that? It seems like you would just have to make a phone call.

DS: I think you’re underrating your stature.

DS: I always wanted to know what the cemeteries are like there. What the funerals are like there. Are they like town meetings in a place where there is so much death?

DS: It fits a template.

DS: The press is often cited for it’s laziness and for reporting any source without checking its accuracy.

DS: Has the war affected you as a person?

DS: It hasn’t affected you then?

DS: It’s affected me.

DS: Every single person I interview I ask about the war because I think it’s important and it has affected me.

DS: That’s what Charles Rangel says.

DS: That’s the only thing that does seem to motivate people to be against the war is to be paying more at the gas pump.

DS: Does it bother you that there’s a lack of outrage?

DS: Or really much about anything.

DS: It doesn’t get better as you go higher

DS: No, that was one of the things that stood out to me at Fordham Law. It’s a top 25 law school in a very vibrant city with a lot of thinkers. I told this anecdote to Floyd Abrams: I was in a Constitutional Law class right after Alito was nominated to be on the Supreme Court. The professor asked 120 law students on the first day of class how many of them thought he should be confirmed. About five students raised their hands. “New York,” I thought. Then he asked how many of them thought Alito should not be confirmed. About ten students raised their hands. Then he asked how many did not feel they had enough information to know. about another five students raised their hands. What is that? 100 students in a Constitutional Law class at a top school can’t proffer an opinion on a Supreme Court nominee? Is that apathy…confusion…fear…? What is it?

DS: After Hurricane Katrina there was a lot of debate on whether we would rebuild one of our own cities as we were over in Iraq demolishing their cities. How did you feel about that?

DS: Yeah, the high areas; the rich areas–

DS: More than it used to be?

DS: Every year you go to Selma? Why?

DS: There was a Times report, I think, about Selma and they say that it is very changed.

DS: Recently Obama and Clinton were down there marching…

DS: And that’s going.

DS: Did you see the election in Alabama when the Christian Coalition defeated the ballot measure to remove the segregation language from the Alabama Constitution that said nobody is guaranteed a right to an education?

DS: Have you changed?

DS: When you were 25 did you look at black people the same way as you look at them now?

DS: Do you think Joel Klein has improved it?

DS: What do you think about Murdoch buying The Wall Street Journal?

DS: It’s painted that way.

DS: Not any more?

DS: Did you see Stephen Colbert roast the Washington Press Corp and Bush at the White House Press Correspondence dinner? Nobody laughed, because they were all coming from the same place.

DS: Because nobody reported about it, or they just said he bombed. Then it went out on the internet and took on a life of its own and people said, “This isn’t bombing, this a roasting of the entire power structure and the power structure decided they didn’t like it.”

DS: A view of the federal government from the national scene? “Here in Denver the reaction to Washington…”

DS: Reporting?

DS: The way it is now, they don’t get an interview with so-and-so if they write something, or they don’t get to go to someone’s party!

DS: Do you think Bob Woodward is still an intrepid Washington reporter? He’s often been accused of being too close to the people he covers.

DS: When I was in my teens and early twenties my travels were very Europe-centric. But as an adult I have been drawn to places either seemingly “dangerous” to me or places that I don’t feel like I know because I’ve read so much about them or seen so often in books and magazines. So Europe is off my map now, though I did sneak into Cuba.

DS: In 2002.

DS: Through the Caymans Islands.

DS: Just took a flight on Aero Caribbean. Now they’ve stopped using the dollar. But back then, they were very much encouraging American tourists to come via Mexico.

DS: 2002.

DS: They stopped using the dollar.

DS: You have the Cuban pesos.

DS: I’m not really sure now because when I was there they had the system where you could actually just use dollars. That’s what we used. The local currency was called pesos convertibles that were convertible into dollars. Of course they have no value anywhere else in the world except in Cuba, but then they stopped doing that. Castro has kind of created Batista’s society in some ways; not in every way. The poor are certainly a lot better off than they were under Batista. But with the embargo, the economy is now very tourist-based, which creates this tourist class. We didn’t stay in the hotels. We wanted to stay in what they call casa particulars and I remember talking to a woman who made $30 a month as a doctor. But running this casa particular, she was making around $300, $500 a month, which made her very rich.

DS: Like a rooming house. Exactly.

DS: That’s probably the best analogy. Staying at those the money goes more to the people. The other thing they tell you when you go to Cuba is to bring aspirin and all these things that are in short supply there. The people who run these Bed and Breakfasts, if you will, make out with all the stuff the tourists give them to be dispersed in their communities. I went to Ecuador. I went camping in the Amazon. These are the places that interest me now. Do you find it similar in your own travels to really seek out things underneath, to pull up rocks and try and find places off the beaten path. Going to Timbuktu or wherever. Do you have a travel philosophy?

DS: And talk to the people.

DS: And a happy society. At least I found a lot of people who were very content. They may not have an easy life, but they were quite content.

DS: People dancing in the streets at night.

DS: And friendly.

DS: My friend I was with was Colombian from Miami, and he made the exact same observation. He had a prejudice against Cubans from his time in Miami and he said, “These people aren’t anything like the Cubans in Miami.”

David Shankbone: Do you have a favorite country you have visited?

DS: You talk about China a lot.

DS: Is it interesting to you to watch China change?

DS: Do you get tired of going to the same region and then you’re like, ‘I need to go to Asia for a while?’

DS: I haven’t been to Asia. It doesn’t particularly interest me all that much. There are countries I would like to see, Cambodia being one. South America is one of the areas that I am most interested to explore because I speak Spanish.

DS: What are the gay bars like?

DS: Are they flamboyant?

DS: It’s because they kill them.

DS: How did you get introduced to a gay bar in Beijing?

DS: Including the European ones, right? English is the international language.

DS: And it’s so basic.

DS: I spoke with a young novelist named John Reed. He wrote a book called Snowball’s Chance that was an attack on Orwell and we were talking about the literary canon that’s taught in grade school and high school. He raised an interesting idea that I wanted to run by you. His point was that kids are not becoming readers. So much of what they learn with books and reading doesn’t seem applicable to their lives. I read in Newsweek that your five favorite novels and there was a lot of classics – The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, things like that. Reed’s point was that kids have a hard time bonding with these materials. What should be taught at those levels is modern literature. At the more senior levels, once they’ve developed acumen for reading and they relate to it on a personal level, then they’ll go exploring the classics and it’s almost more pertinent to them being able to understand it. An analogy would be as if you had children and they only watched Bette Davis and Joan Crawford movies and then the film genre would wither because young people found it difficult to relate to it. What do you think about that idea?

DS: Not kids.

DS: That’s a phenomenon. It’s not really that typical; I mean, it stands out because it’s a billion dollar author.

DS: And they can’t say certain things.

DS: Would you agree with the idea that children don’t grow up reading much anymore, outside of what’s required?

DS: You’re saying that there never was really a time when people read more unless they had cause to read a lot based upon their circumstances?

DS: Is that who you were reading at that age?

DS: I’ve read The Plot Against America.

Uncategorized

Gay Talese on the state of journalism, Iraq and his life

Saturday, October 27, 2007 

Gay Talese wants to go to Iraq. “It so happens there is someone that’s working on such a thing right now for me,” the 75-year-old legendary journalist and author told David Shankbone. “Even if I was on Al-Jazeera with a gun to my head, I wouldn’t be pleading with those bastards! I’d say, ‘Go ahead. Make my day.'”

Few reporters will ever reach the stature of Talese. His 1966 profile of Frank Sinatra, Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, was not only cited by The Economist as the greatest profile of Sinatra ever written, but is considered the greatest of any celebrity profile ever written. In the 70th anniversary issue of Esquire in October 2003, the editors declared the piece the “Best Story Esquire Ever Published.”

Talese helped create and define a new style of literary reporting called New Journalism. Talese himself told National Public Radio he rejects this label (“The term new journalism became very fashionable on college campuses in the 1970s and some of its practitioners tended to be a little loose with the facts. And that’s where I wanted to part company.”)

He is not bothered by the Bancrofts selling The Wall Street Journal—”It’s not like we should lament the passing of some noble dynasty!”—to Rupert Murdoch, but he is bothered by how the press supported and sold the Iraq War to the American people. “The press in Washington got us into this war as much as the people that are controlling it,” said Talese. “They took information that was second-hand information, and they went along with it.” He wants to see the Washington press corp disbanded and sent around the country to get back in touch with the people it covers; that the press should not be so focused on–and in bed with–the federal government.

Augusten Burroughs once said that writers are experience junkies, and Talese fits the bill. Talese–who has been married to Nan Talese (she edited James Frey’s Million Little Piece) for fifty years–can be found at baseball games in Cuba or the gay bars of Beijing, wanting to see humanity in all its experience.

Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s interview with Gay Talese.

David Shankbone: Does it bother you that your name has come to mean ‘homosexual’?

DS: [Laughs] “Sports Gay-zing”?

DS: Is your ancestry Sicilian or Northern?

DS: Southern, not Sicilian?

DS: Do you ever pay any attention to Italian politics and the happenings with the Lega Nord?

DS: They can’t seem to do anything politically. They can’t save Venice ….

DS: Do you believe in a higher power?

DS: What do you think happens when we die?

DS: Do you have religion?

DS: Do you pray?

DS: In certain moments more than others?

DS: When do you feel out of control?

DS: What did the letter say?

DS: How many times have you seen your own death?

DS: You wouldn’t want to be a Terri Schiavo.

DS: You’re quite sprite.

DS: Doing what you love

DS: What do you think is the reason there is this collective idea to give Americans a certain view of a place or a people that is not necessarily accurate? I think Iran is another good example, where we are consistently fed images and notions about a people and a culture that aren’t really accurate.

DS: Or fair minded. But the reality is far more interesting than the same stories we are consistently fed.

DS: And Americans are the donkeys as well?

DS: But people are still consuming what they’re throwing out there though.

DS: It’s dangerous to actually go out there and hit the pavement.

DS: How could there not be?

DS: Sure.

DS: Have you been there?

DS: Why haven’t you?

DS: That shouldn’t be too hard for you.

DS: Esquire?

DS: Esquire does political reporting.

DS: What would be the difficulties for you in achieving that? It seems like you would just have to make a phone call.

DS: I think you’re underrating your stature.

DS: I always wanted to know what the cemeteries are like there. What the funerals are like there. Are they like town meetings in a place where there is so much death?

DS: It fits a template.

DS: The press is often cited for it’s laziness and for reporting any source without checking its accuracy.

DS: Has the war affected you as a person?

DS: It hasn’t affected you then?

DS: It’s affected me.

DS: Every single person I interview I ask about the war because I think it’s important and it has affected me.

DS: That’s what Charles Rangel says.

DS: That’s the only thing that does seem to motivate people to be against the war is to be paying more at the gas pump.

DS: Does it bother you that there’s a lack of outrage?

DS: Or really much about anything.

DS: It doesn’t get better as you go higher

DS: No, that was one of the things that stood out to me at Fordham Law. It’s a top 25 law school in a very vibrant city with a lot of thinkers. I told this anecdote to Floyd Abrams: I was in a Constitutional Law class right after Alito was nominated to be on the Supreme Court. The professor asked 120 law students on the first day of class how many of them thought he should be confirmed. About five students raised their hands. “New York,” I thought. Then he asked how many of them thought Alito should not be confirmed. About ten students raised their hands. Then he asked how many did not feel they had enough information to know. about another five students raised their hands. What is that? 100 students in a Constitutional Law class at a top school can’t proffer an opinion on a Supreme Court nominee? Is that apathy…confusion…fear…? What is it?

DS: After Hurricane Katrina there was a lot of debate on whether we would rebuild one of our own cities as we were over in Iraq demolishing their cities. How did you feel about that?

DS: Yeah, the high areas; the rich areas–

DS: More than it used to be?

DS: Every year you go to Selma? Why?

DS: There was a Times report, I think, about Selma and they say that it is very changed.

DS: Recently Obama and Clinton were down there marching…

DS: And that’s going.

DS: Did you see the election in Alabama when the Christian Coalition defeated the ballot measure to remove the segregation language from the Alabama Constitution that said nobody is guaranteed a right to an education?

DS: Have you changed?

DS: When you were 25 did you look at black people the same way as you look at them now?

DS: Do you think Joel Klein has improved it?

DS: What do you think about Murdoch buying The Wall Street Journal?

DS: It’s painted that way.

DS: Not any more?

DS: Did you see Stephen Colbert roast the Washington Press Corp and Bush at the White House Press Correspondence dinner? Nobody laughed, because they were all coming from the same place.

DS: Because nobody reported about it, or they just said he bombed. Then it went out on the internet and took on a life of its own and people said, “This isn’t bombing, this a roasting of the entire power structure and the power structure decided they didn’t like it.”

DS: A view of the federal government from the national scene? “Here in Denver the reaction to Washington…”

DS: Reporting?

DS: The way it is now, they don’t get an interview with so-and-so if they write something, or they don’t get to go to someone’s party!

DS: Do you think Bob Woodward is still an intrepid Washington reporter? He’s often been accused of being too close to the people he covers.

DS: When I was in my teens and early twenties my travels were very Europe-centric. But as an adult I have been drawn to places either seemingly “dangerous” to me or places that I don’t feel like I know because I’ve read so much about them or seen so often in books and magazines. So Europe is off my map now, though I did sneak into Cuba.

DS: In 2002.

DS: Through the Caymans Islands.

DS: Just took a flight on Aero Caribbean. Now they’ve stopped using the dollar. But back then, they were very much encouraging American tourists to come via Mexico.

DS: 2002.

DS: They stopped using the dollar.

DS: You have the Cuban pesos.

DS: I’m not really sure now because when I was there they had the system where you could actually just use dollars. That’s what we used. The local currency was called pesos convertibles that were convertible into dollars. Of course they have no value anywhere else in the world except in Cuba, but then they stopped doing that. Castro has kind of created Batista’s society in some ways; not in every way. The poor are certainly a lot better off than they were under Batista. But with the embargo, the economy is now very tourist-based, which creates this tourist class. We didn’t stay in the hotels. We wanted to stay in what they call casa particulars and I remember talking to a woman who made $30 a month as a doctor. But running this casa particular, she was making around $300, $500 a month, which made her very rich.

DS: Like a rooming house. Exactly.

DS: That’s probably the best analogy. Staying at those the money goes more to the people. The other thing they tell you when you go to Cuba is to bring aspirin and all these things that are in short supply there. The people who run these Bed and Breakfasts, if you will, make out with all the stuff the tourists give them to be dispersed in their communities. I went to Ecuador. I went camping in the Amazon. These are the places that interest me now. Do you find it similar in your own travels to really seek out things underneath, to pull up rocks and try and find places off the beaten path. Going to Timbuktu or wherever. Do you have a travel philosophy?

DS: And talk to the people.

DS: And a happy society. At least I found a lot of people who were very content. They may not have an easy life, but they were quite content.

DS: People dancing in the streets at night.

DS: And friendly.

DS: My friend I was with was Colombian from Miami, and he made the exact same observation. He had a prejudice against Cubans from his time in Miami and he said, “These people aren’t anything like the Cubans in Miami.”

David Shankbone: Do you have a favorite country you have visited?

DS: You talk about China a lot.

DS: Is it interesting to you to watch China change?

DS: Do you get tired of going to the same region and then you’re like, ‘I need to go to Asia for a while?’

DS: I haven’t been to Asia. It doesn’t particularly interest me all that much. There are countries I would like to see, Cambodia being one. South America is one of the areas that I am most interested to explore because I speak Spanish.

DS: What are the gay bars like?

DS: Are they flamboyant?

DS: It’s because they kill them.

DS: How did you get introduced to a gay bar in Beijing?

DS: Including the European ones, right? English is the international language.

DS: And it’s so basic.

DS: I spoke with a young novelist named John Reed. He wrote a book called Snowball’s Chance that was an attack on Orwell and we were talking about the literary canon that’s taught in grade school and high school. He raised an interesting idea that I wanted to run by you. His point was that kids are not becoming readers. So much of what they learn with books and reading doesn’t seem applicable to their lives. I read in Newsweek that your five favorite novels and there was a lot of classics – The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, things like that. Reed’s point was that kids have a hard time bonding with these materials. What should be taught at those levels is modern literature. At the more senior levels, once they’ve developed acumen for reading and they relate to it on a personal level, then they’ll go exploring the classics and it’s almost more pertinent to them being able to understand it. An analogy would be as if you had children and they only watched Bette Davis and Joan Crawford movies and then the film genre would wither because young people found it difficult to relate to it. What do you think about that idea?

DS: Not kids.

DS: That’s a phenomenon. It’s not really that typical; I mean, it stands out because it’s a billion dollar author.

DS: And they can’t say certain things.

DS: Would you agree with the idea that children don’t grow up reading much anymore, outside of what’s required?

DS: You’re saying that there never was really a time when people read more unless they had cause to read a lot based upon their circumstances?

DS: Is that who you were reading at that age?

DS: I’ve read The Plot Against America.

Uncategorized

Gay Talese on the state of journalism, Iraq and his life

Saturday, October 27, 2007 

Gay Talese wants to go to Iraq. “It so happens there is someone that’s working on such a thing right now for me,” the 75-year-old legendary journalist and author told David Shankbone. “Even if I was on Al-Jazeera with a gun to my head, I wouldn’t be pleading with those bastards! I’d say, ‘Go ahead. Make my day.'”

Few reporters will ever reach the stature of Talese. His 1966 profile of Frank Sinatra, Frank Sinatra Has a Cold, was not only cited by The Economist as the greatest profile of Sinatra ever written, but is considered the greatest of any celebrity profile ever written. In the 70th anniversary issue of Esquire in October 2003, the editors declared the piece the “Best Story Esquire Ever Published.”

Talese helped create and define a new style of literary reporting called New Journalism. Talese himself told National Public Radio he rejects this label (“The term new journalism became very fashionable on college campuses in the 1970s and some of its practitioners tended to be a little loose with the facts. And that’s where I wanted to part company.”)

He is not bothered by the Bancrofts selling The Wall Street Journal—”It’s not like we should lament the passing of some noble dynasty!”—to Rupert Murdoch, but he is bothered by how the press supported and sold the Iraq War to the American people. “The press in Washington got us into this war as much as the people that are controlling it,” said Talese. “They took information that was second-hand information, and they went along with it.” He wants to see the Washington press corp disbanded and sent around the country to get back in touch with the people it covers; that the press should not be so focused on–and in bed with–the federal government.

Augusten Burroughs once said that writers are experience junkies, and Talese fits the bill. Talese–who has been married to Nan Talese (she edited James Frey’s Million Little Piece) for fifty years–can be found at baseball games in Cuba or the gay bars of Beijing, wanting to see humanity in all its experience.

Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s interview with Gay Talese.

David Shankbone: Does it bother you that your name has come to mean ‘homosexual’?

DS: [Laughs] “Sports Gay-zing”?

DS: Is your ancestry Sicilian or Northern?

DS: Southern, not Sicilian?

DS: Do you ever pay any attention to Italian politics and the happenings with the Lega Nord?

DS: They can’t seem to do anything politically. They can’t save Venice ….

DS: Do you believe in a higher power?

DS: What do you think happens when we die?

DS: Do you have religion?

DS: Do you pray?

DS: In certain moments more than others?

DS: When do you feel out of control?

DS: What did the letter say?

DS: How many times have you seen your own death?

DS: You wouldn’t want to be a Terri Schiavo.

DS: You’re quite sprite.

DS: Doing what you love

DS: What do you think is the reason there is this collective idea to give Americans a certain view of a place or a people that is not necessarily accurate? I think Iran is another good example, where we are consistently fed images and notions about a people and a culture that aren’t really accurate.

DS: Or fair minded. But the reality is far more interesting than the same stories we are consistently fed.

DS: And Americans are the donkeys as well?

DS: But people are still consuming what they’re throwing out there though.

DS: It’s dangerous to actually go out there and hit the pavement.

DS: How could there not be?

DS: Sure.

DS: Have you been there?

DS: Why haven’t you?

DS: That shouldn’t be too hard for you.

DS: Esquire?

DS: Esquire does political reporting.

DS: What would be the difficulties for you in achieving that? It seems like you would just have to make a phone call.

DS: I think you’re underrating your stature.

DS: I always wanted to know what the cemeteries are like there. What the funerals are like there. Are they like town meetings in a place where there is so much death?

DS: It fits a template.

DS: The press is often cited for it’s laziness and for reporting any source without checking its accuracy.

DS: Has the war affected you as a person?

DS: It hasn’t affected you then?

DS: It’s affected me.

DS: Every single person I interview I ask about the war because I think it’s important and it has affected me.

DS: That’s what Charles Rangel says.

DS: That’s the only thing that does seem to motivate people to be against the war is to be paying more at the gas pump.

DS: Does it bother you that there’s a lack of outrage?

DS: Or really much about anything.

DS: It doesn’t get better as you go higher

DS: No, that was one of the things that stood out to me at Fordham Law. It’s a top 25 law school in a very vibrant city with a lot of thinkers. I told this anecdote to Floyd Abrams: I was in a Constitutional Law class right after Alito was nominated to be on the Supreme Court. The professor asked 120 law students on the first day of class how many of them thought he should be confirmed. About five students raised their hands. “New York,” I thought. Then he asked how many of them thought Alito should not be confirmed. About ten students raised their hands. Then he asked how many did not feel they had enough information to know. about another five students raised their hands. What is that? 100 students in a Constitutional Law class at a top school can’t proffer an opinion on a Supreme Court nominee? Is that apathy…confusion…fear…? What is it?

DS: After Hurricane Katrina there was a lot of debate on whether we would rebuild one of our own cities as we were over in Iraq demolishing their cities. How did you feel about that?

DS: Yeah, the high areas; the rich areas–

DS: More than it used to be?

DS: Every year you go to Selma? Why?

DS: There was a Times report, I think, about Selma and they say that it is very changed.

DS: Recently Obama and Clinton were down there marching…

DS: And that’s going.

DS: Did you see the election in Alabama when the Christian Coalition defeated the ballot measure to remove the segregation language from the Alabama Constitution that said nobody is guaranteed a right to an education?

DS: Have you changed?

DS: When you were 25 did you look at black people the same way as you look at them now?

DS: Do you think Joel Klein has improved it?

DS: What do you think about Murdoch buying The Wall Street Journal?

DS: It’s painted that way.

DS: Not any more?

DS: Did you see Stephen Colbert roast the Washington Press Corp and Bush at the White House Press Correspondence dinner? Nobody laughed, because they were all coming from the same place.

DS: Because nobody reported about it, or they just said he bombed. Then it went out on the internet and took on a life of its own and people said, “This isn’t bombing, this a roasting of the entire power structure and the power structure decided they didn’t like it.”

DS: A view of the federal government from the national scene? “Here in Denver the reaction to Washington…”

DS: Reporting?

DS: The way it is now, they don’t get an interview with so-and-so if they write something, or they don’t get to go to someone’s party!

DS: Do you think Bob Woodward is still an intrepid Washington reporter? He’s often been accused of being too close to the people he covers.

DS: When I was in my teens and early twenties my travels were very Europe-centric. But as an adult I have been drawn to places either seemingly “dangerous” to me or places that I don’t feel like I know because I’ve read so much about them or seen so often in books and magazines. So Europe is off my map now, though I did sneak into Cuba.

DS: In 2002.

DS: Through the Caymans Islands.

DS: Just took a flight on Aero Caribbean. Now they’ve stopped using the dollar. But back then, they were very much encouraging American tourists to come via Mexico.

DS: 2002.

DS: They stopped using the dollar.

DS: You have the Cuban pesos.

DS: I’m not really sure now because when I was there they had the system where you could actually just use dollars. That’s what we used. The local currency was called pesos convertibles that were convertible into dollars. Of course they have no value anywhere else in the world except in Cuba, but then they stopped doing that. Castro has kind of created Batista’s society in some ways; not in every way. The poor are certainly a lot better off than they were under Batista. But with the embargo, the economy is now very tourist-based, which creates this tourist class. We didn’t stay in the hotels. We wanted to stay in what they call casa particulars and I remember talking to a woman who made $30 a month as a doctor. But running this casa particular, she was making around $300, $500 a month, which made her very rich.

DS: Like a rooming house. Exactly.

DS: That’s probably the best analogy. Staying at those the money goes more to the people. The other thing they tell you when you go to Cuba is to bring aspirin and all these things that are in short supply there. The people who run these Bed and Breakfasts, if you will, make out with all the stuff the tourists give them to be dispersed in their communities. I went to Ecuador. I went camping in the Amazon. These are the places that interest me now. Do you find it similar in your own travels to really seek out things underneath, to pull up rocks and try and find places off the beaten path. Going to Timbuktu or wherever. Do you have a travel philosophy?

DS: And talk to the people.

DS: And a happy society. At least I found a lot of people who were very content. They may not have an easy life, but they were quite content.

DS: People dancing in the streets at night.

DS: And friendly.

DS: My friend I was with was Colombian from Miami, and he made the exact same observation. He had a prejudice against Cubans from his time in Miami and he said, “These people aren’t anything like the Cubans in Miami.”

David Shankbone: Do you have a favorite country you have visited?

DS: You talk about China a lot.

DS: Is it interesting to you to watch China change?

DS: Do you get tired of going to the same region and then you’re like, ‘I need to go to Asia for a while?’

DS: I haven’t been to Asia. It doesn’t particularly interest me all that much. There are countries I would like to see, Cambodia being one. South America is one of the areas that I am most interested to explore because I speak Spanish.

DS: What are the gay bars like?

DS: Are they flamboyant?

DS: It’s because they kill them.

DS: How did you get introduced to a gay bar in Beijing?

DS: Including the European ones, right? English is the international language.

DS: And it’s so basic.

DS: I spoke with a young novelist named John Reed. He wrote a book called Snowball’s Chance that was an attack on Orwell and we were talking about the literary canon that’s taught in grade school and high school. He raised an interesting idea that I wanted to run by you. His point was that kids are not becoming readers. So much of what they learn with books and reading doesn’t seem applicable to their lives. I read in Newsweek that your five favorite novels and there was a lot of classics – The Scarlet Letter, The Great Gatsby, things like that. Reed’s point was that kids have a hard time bonding with these materials. What should be taught at those levels is modern literature. At the more senior levels, once they’ve developed acumen for reading and they relate to it on a personal level, then they’ll go exploring the classics and it’s almost more pertinent to them being able to understand it. An analogy would be as if you had children and they only watched Bette Davis and Joan Crawford movies and then the film genre would wither because young people found it difficult to relate to it. What do you think about that idea?

DS: Not kids.

DS: That’s a phenomenon. It’s not really that typical; I mean, it stands out because it’s a billion dollar author.

DS: And they can’t say certain things.

DS: Would you agree with the idea that children don’t grow up reading much anymore, outside of what’s required?

DS: You’re saying that there never was really a time when people read more unless they had cause to read a lot based upon their circumstances?

DS: Is that who you were reading at that age?

DS: I’ve read The Plot Against America.

Surveyors

Learning The Course Of Action Right Behind Home Loans Without Deposit Melbourne

More On This Topic:

Learning The Course Of Action Right Behind Home Loans Without Deposit Melbourne

by

Susanne Dubey

Previously you might be lent entire level of deposit for home loan without any guarantor or perhaps evidence of savings. Because of GFC, absolutely no lender is able to offer home loans without deposit Melbourne. Yet still there are specific methods in which you can get no deposit housing Melbourne loan. So as to obtain no deposit house Melbourne with no guarantor you need to existing the data of your respective savings as well as need to very own a home against which loan with out deposit for a home loan may be passed. In circumstance you might think of any of the above choice, there are several lenders whom willingly postpone off a number of the additional processing expenses.

So how exactly does home rent to buy Melbourne operates?

Usually income lender offers you about 95 % from the loan and tends to make design associated with an accredited credit card transporting something of about $ 20,500 combined with mortgage. A person\’s eye in the credit greeting card is as little as the property loan interest with the result that you are able to Rent To Buy Melbourne

in 100% loan deposit without having something. Exactly what based could be close to $ 400, Thousand, though it may vary depending upon situations. Now you should end up being wondering why a new lender ought to consider you for a great deal volume and also what does this individual wants to acquire permitting you the loan to be able to rent to own Australia.

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The actual lender expects that you show a balance of about 5% of getting value within your bank-account that has been stable pertaining to minimal 3 months. This is because there are people who take credit coming from fellow workers or perhaps buddies for few days in order that the lowest 5 percent quantity gets viewable inside the accounts. The three 30 days holding period of time helps to make the lender assured of one\’s capability to set up adequate funds. You can make utilization of imaginative method of capital just in case you would not have down payment associated with 5 percent much like the common standards of the financial institution. But this sort of Rent To Own Melbourne

loan is extremely pricey and you need to opt for the idea only when you may not squeeze into the conventional loan standards.

Ideas to be eligible for home rent to buy Melbourne mortgage

If you are wanting to apply for absolutely no deposit home loan you then must begin to make contribution throughout little bit in your keeping standard bank in order that Five percent with the expected purchase price will be kept in your accounts.

Do not really go on altering careers. This might bring about irregularity in wage which can quit your factor for the keeping bank account.

Never maintain just about any charges imminent. Imminent costs reveal quite terribly in your credit and banking institutions and financial organizations hair comb every single detail concerning your phone bill, electricity bill, insurance costs and so on to verify the potential to pay the bills along with payments frequently.

All these points in case noted can help you achieve the correct regarding loan for you to lease home within Melbourne.

Author, Susanne Dubey Dubey specializes in writing about Rent to Own, Rent To Buy, No Deposit Home, No Deposit House,

Rent To Buy

,

No Deposit Home Melbourne

, No Deposit Finance & rent to buy house subjects.

Article Source:

ArticleRich.com

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NASA: Series of errors led to loss of Mars Global Surveyor

Saturday, April 14, 2007 

A complex series of events, including a five month-old computer error, was responsible for the battery failure that led to the loss of NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor last year, an internal review board says. Findings from a preliminary report released on Friday say that while NASA controllers followed procedures while operating the craft, the procedures did not cover the types of errors that occurred.

According to NASA, on November 2, 2006, the Global Surveyor was ordered to perform a routine adjustment of its solar panels. However, the Global Surveyor reoriented to an angle that exposed one of its two batteries to direct sunlight. The battery overheated, which led to the depletion of both batteries. An incorrect setting in antenna orientation prevented Global Surveyor from relaying its status to NASA controllers. Its preprogrammed systems did not take into account the need to maintain a thermally safe orientation.

That was the last communication that NASA controllers had with the spacecraft.

The Global Surveyor was the first US mission to Mars in twenty years, For ten years, the craft returned detailed information to NASA scientists providing new insights, including evidence that appeared to show the presence of water on Mars and identification of deposits of water-related minerals, which led to selection of a Mars rover landing site.

“The loss of the spacecraft was the result of a series of events linked to a computer error made five months before the likely battery failure,” said Dolly Perkins, board chairperson and deputy director-technical of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

The board concluded that NASA controllers had followed procedures, but that the procedures did not adequately cover the type of errors that occurred. In its final report, the board will offer recommendations applicable to future missions.

“We are making an end-to-end review of all our missions to be sure that we apply the lessons learned from Mars Global Surveyor to all our ongoing missions,” said Fuk Li, Mars Exploration Program manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

The Global Surveyor was the longest operating spacecraft at Mars and had lasted four times longer than expected.

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Jewelry courier robbed in Washington; three men arrested

Thursday, September 27, 2007 

Three American men were arrested after they robbed a jewelry courier at gunpoint today. The robbery was made at a McDonalds restaurant in Factoria, Washington at approximately 9:40 a.m.

The men drove away but the courier was lucky enough to provide a description of the white van and the robbers, who were pursued by local police towards Interstate 90 in Snoqualmie, Washington, east of Factoria, where the van was stopped. The three men were arrested and the van was searched by a K-9 unit.

The value of the jewels is unknown.

Uncategorized

Jewelry courier robbed in Washington; three men arrested

Thursday, September 27, 2007 

Three American men were arrested after they robbed a jewelry courier at gunpoint today. The robbery was made at a McDonalds restaurant in Factoria, Washington at approximately 9:40 a.m.

The men drove away but the courier was lucky enough to provide a description of the white van and the robbers, who were pursued by local police towards Interstate 90 in Snoqualmie, Washington, east of Factoria, where the van was stopped. The three men were arrested and the van was searched by a K-9 unit.

The value of the jewels is unknown.

Health

3 Things That Would Help You Get The Most Out Of Your Dental Implants

3 Things That Would Help You Get The Most Out of Your Dental Implants

by

Rohan Sinha

Now that you\’ve had dental implants for your missing teeth, you must be feeling very excited and happy! Well, congrats from my side! Here in this article, I\’m going to share with you 3 things that would do a world of good to you, to your teeth.

1. Icing

Your doctor will give a lot of instructions, and you better follow them all. Post-procedure, icing the area that has just been operated upon is very important for the success of your dental implants surgery.

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2. Rest

Rest is equally important for your early recuperation. After all, it\’s a surgery, and the body, particularly the mouth, will take its own time to adjust to the new thing in it.

3. Pain Killers

Pain is obvious after the dental implants surgery, however, your doctor will give you some pain killers in advance. So, if pain doesn\’t subside, don\’t hesitate in taking a pain killer.

In case, the pain doesn\’t subside and becomes intolerable, you should visit your doctor\’s. Avoid taking over-the-counter pills or paste without consulting your doctor. If he suggests you a pill, only then take it.

There is one very important thing here (if there is only one thing that you want to take from this article, let it be this advice): look for the best dental clinic in your area or neighbourhood areas. Google for the best dental clinic in India (you can replace India with the name of your city or locality). Please, don\’t get the treatment from any dental clinic that you come across in your locality or your friend tells you about. If it is about dental implants, take all the time before you settle down on one particular clinic, doctor, or hospital. A dental surgeon is going to make a lot of difference to how the outcome will finally turn out.

Dental implants, if you look at the trends in the last one or two decades, have emerged as among the best solutions for those who have one or many missed teeth, and feel embarrassed when confronting friends and colleagues. Finding a solution for missing teeth isn\’t only important for cosmetic reasons, but also for functional reasons. Dental implants look and feel like your natural teeth, however, you need to give your body some time to adjust to this new change. Last, but not the least, follow your doctor\’s instructions. And, also, don\’t miss out on follow up sessions so any sort of complications can be resolved before it gets worse.

At Max Healthcare, we take complete care of your teeth. So, if it is

about dental implants

, do make sure you check with us. Whether you\’re

looking for the best dental clinic in India

or affordable dental implants, we\’ve a lot for you on our website.

Article Source:

ArticleRich.com

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Pennsylvania state trooper found guilty of first-degree murder

Friday, March 20, 2009 

In the United States, a suspended Pennsylvania state trooper has been convicted of first-degree murder for killing his girlfriend’s estranged husband.

Kevin Foley, 43, faces a mandatory life sentence without parole for slashing to death John Yelenic, a Blairsville dentist who was in the final stages of divorcing his wife, Michele. Foley’s attorney said he plans to appeal the decision. Prosecutors did not seek the death penalty.

Foley previously said he “loathed Dr. Yelenic” and asked another fellow trooper to help kill him. During his testimony, which lasted several hours, Foley claimed he was joking and had no true intention of carrying out the threat, but the Indiana County jury rejected that defense after about six hours of deliberations.

John Yelenic was found dead in his home on April 13, 2006, one day before he was planning on signing his divorce papers. Charges were brought against Foley in September 2007, more than 17 months after the murder.

Foley, who had been on suspension from the Pennsylvania State Police, was himself the final witness to take the stand Wednesday in the trial. Foley insisted he was innocent during his testimony, and even made jokes that the jury laughed at on a few occasions.

“I never made a threat with the intention of carrying it out,” Foley said under cross-examination by the prosecution.

When Senior Deputy Attorney General Anthony Krastek pressed Foley for what was funny about asking another state trooper to help him kill Yelenic, Foley answered, “There isn’t any joke. It’s just my personality, my behavior (with co-workers).”

Prosecutors said Foley killed Yelenic after going to the dentist’s house to confront him over the terms of the divorce. Prosecutors claim Foley slashed Yelenic several times with a knife and pushed his head through a small window. Yelenic bled to death.

“John has his justice tonight,” Mary Ann Clark, a cousin of Yelenic, told MSNBC. “John deserved this; he was the most wonderful person in the world. He died the most horrible death and tonight, this is his night. The system worked.”

Foley had been living with Michele Yelenic for two years at the time of the homicide. Prosecutors previously said Foley and Michele helped perpetuate rumors that Dr. Yelenic molested their son. John and Michele Yelenic had been separated in 2002. Michele Yelenic stood to collect Dr. Yelenic’s estate and a US$1 million life insurance policy, and could lose about $2,500 a month in support if the divorce was finalized, a Pennsylvania grand jury previously determined.

Michele Yelenic, who has not appeared at the trial, may face legal action herself, media reports indicated. A sentencing hearing for Foley is scheduled for June 1.